South Korea confirms endangered stork breeding successful

Endangered stork breeding attempt succeeds in central S. Korea

2016/05/23 11:59

YESAN, South Korea, May 23 (Yonhap) — A released stork has hatched two chicks in the wild in the country’s central region, marking the species’ first natural breeding in the country, the Yesan municipal government said Monday, quoting a research center tasked with restoring the endangered bird.

The Oriental White Stork Park in Yesan, a town in South Korea’s central province of South Chungcheong, said its researchers confirmed the chicks in a nest of a female stork named Minhwang and a male stork named Manhwang on Sunday. The two are part of eight storks that the park returned to the wild in September last year.

The female stork Minhwang (L) and male stork Manhwang tend to their newly hatched chicks at a stork park in Yesan, a town about 134 kilometers south of Seoul, in this photo provided on May 23, 2016, by the Yesan municipality. (Yonhap) The female stork Minhwang (L) and male stork Manhwang tend to their newly hatched chicks at a stork park in Yesan, a town about 134 kilometers south of Seoul, in this photo provided on May 23, 2016, by the Yesan municipality. (Yonhap)

Observation of the chicks through a telescope showed they are around 10 centimeters long, and they are believed to have hatched on Friday and Sunday, respectively, based on their body sizes, the center said.

It is the first time since 1971, when the species became extinct in the wild in South Korea that the stork has had natural breeding. About a month ago, the park said Minhwang laid at least two eggs in the wild.

Minhwang and Manhwang had flown as far as North Korea via the southwestern town of Yeonggwang before settling in the nest early last month. The couple were spotted taking turns sitting on the eggs and keeping the nest in good shape, it said.

This file photo, dated Sept. 3, 2015, shows Oriental white storks being released into the wild from a stork park in the town of Yesan, 134 kilometers south of Seoul. (Yonhap) This file photo, dated Sept. 3, 2015, shows Oriental white storks being released into the wild from a stork park in the town of Yesan, 134 kilometers south of Seoul. (Yonhap)

The Yesan municipal government established the park in 2009 as part of its efforts to promote the reintroduction of the bird, designated as national monument No. 199, and released six adult storks and two young ones into the wild last year. It plans to return 10 storks a year to the wild after reorienting them.

namsh@yna.co.kr

(END)

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Dedicated efforts from conservationists and townspeople in France have saved white storks from going extinct in the country.

Ciconia ciconia -Mscichy, Grajewo County, Poland-8.jpgDedicated efforts from conservationists and townspeople in France have saved white storks from going extinct in the country.

Nearly wiped out in the 1960s by industrialization, the white stork has made a comeback in France thanks to conservation efforts.

The same rule applies walking through the streets of Alsace, France, as it does in the Sistine Chapel: Don’t forget to look up.

Nowadays, white storks—harbingers of fertility and good fortune—perch above Alsace (map) in nests that can grow large enough to almost fit a smart car. This wasn’t always true: Rewind to the 1980s, and these roughly three feet (meter) tall birds were mostly found adorning signs and as figurines in tourist shops throughout this region of eastern France. Continue reading

Baby boom of storks in Amur region

22 April 2015

Drone detects that the bird famed for bringing babies… is doing exactly this.

‘The last time I saw six eggs in a stork nest was about 30 years ago after a major flood’. Picture: Yuri Gafarov

We are all familiar with how new babies arrive – storks fly over the rooftops delivering the little bundles to happy parents. This account goes back deep in time, but modern conservationists are hailing the latest successes of the bird near the Amur River.

A drone purchased by the Russian Wildlife Fund with financial support HSBC bank in neighbouring China detected a definite baby boom – of storks, says local WWF spokeswoman Elena Starostina. The drone opens the possibility of peering into the nests of storks high on power line poles, for example.

‘The last time I saw six eggs in a stork nest was about 30 years ago after a major flood,’ said the director of the Amur Branch of WWF Russia, noted ecologist Yuri Darman. ‘And now again Amur spilled water into the valleys, poured fresh water into the lakes, filled the riverbeds. The storks once again have the hope of a bright future.’

He speculated: ‘More storks means more children in Russian families along the great Amur river.’ Continue reading