South Korea confirms endangered stork breeding successful

Endangered stork breeding attempt succeeds in central S. Korea

2016/05/23 11:59

YESAN, South Korea, May 23 (Yonhap) — A released stork has hatched two chicks in the wild in the country’s central region, marking the species’ first natural breeding in the country, the Yesan municipal government said Monday, quoting a research center tasked with restoring the endangered bird.

The Oriental White Stork Park in Yesan, a town in South Korea’s central province of South Chungcheong, said its researchers confirmed the chicks in a nest of a female stork named Minhwang and a male stork named Manhwang on Sunday. The two are part of eight storks that the park returned to the wild in September last year.

The female stork Minhwang (L) and male stork Manhwang tend to their newly hatched chicks at a stork park in Yesan, a town about 134 kilometers south of Seoul, in this photo provided on May 23, 2016, by the Yesan municipality. (Yonhap) The female stork Minhwang (L) and male stork Manhwang tend to their newly hatched chicks at a stork park in Yesan, a town about 134 kilometers south of Seoul, in this photo provided on May 23, 2016, by the Yesan municipality. (Yonhap)

Observation of the chicks through a telescope showed they are around 10 centimeters long, and they are believed to have hatched on Friday and Sunday, respectively, based on their body sizes, the center said.

It is the first time since 1971, when the species became extinct in the wild in South Korea that the stork has had natural breeding. About a month ago, the park said Minhwang laid at least two eggs in the wild.

Minhwang and Manhwang had flown as far as North Korea via the southwestern town of Yeonggwang before settling in the nest early last month. The couple were spotted taking turns sitting on the eggs and keeping the nest in good shape, it said.

This file photo, dated Sept. 3, 2015, shows Oriental white storks being released into the wild from a stork park in the town of Yesan, 134 kilometers south of Seoul. (Yonhap) This file photo, dated Sept. 3, 2015, shows Oriental white storks being released into the wild from a stork park in the town of Yesan, 134 kilometers south of Seoul. (Yonhap)

The Yesan municipal government established the park in 2009 as part of its efforts to promote the reintroduction of the bird, designated as national monument No. 199, and released six adult storks and two young ones into the wild last year. It plans to return 10 storks a year to the wild after reorienting them.

namsh@yna.co.kr

(END)

Advertisements

South Koreans challenge huge marriages

Small is beautiful, say South Koreans making plans to marry

Reuters

Groom puts a wedding ring on his bride's finger during a wedding ceremony at a budget wedding hall at the National Library of Korea in Seoul, South Korea

View gallery
A groom puts a wedding ring on his bride’s finger during a wedding ceremony at a budget wedding hall …

By Christine Kim

 SEOUL (Reuters) – The night before their wedding, Kim Kwang-yoon and Cho Jin-oh were up until 2 a.m. with the bride’s mother, setting tables. Their marriage venue: a room in the basement of Seoul city hall, rented from the government for $60.

(…)

South Korean weddings are typically a show of status, with hundreds of guests and expensive gifts. The average expenditure, from a survey by wedding planner Duo, excludes the cost of housing, traditionally provided by parents.

“I felt that if I don’t like getting invitations from people I don’t know very well, they would feel the same. I wished for my wedding to be celebrated by people I wanted there,” said Cho, 32. She and her 34-year-old husband paid the $10,000 cost of their recent wedding themselves.

Huge marriage expenses prompt more young people to delay marriage, and consequently children, worsening one of the world’s lowest birth rates in a population that is ageing the fastest in the industrialised world.

The trend began to take off last year, spurred partly by celebrities, said Kim Jung-youl, an official of the Ministry of Gender Equality and Family.

Last month, movie stars Won Bin and Lee Na-young got married in a wheat field 150 km (93 miles) from Seoul, amid fewer than 50 guests.

Kim and Cho, who sell indoor lighting online, saved on the venue and Cho’s wedding dress, bought online for $100, but a two-week honeymoon to Paris soaked up half their spending.

“Weddings turned into lavish affairs because South Koreans were packing traditions from here and the West into one,” said Lee Sung-hee, a senior planner at Duo, the country’s largest matchmaking and wedding consultation company.

(…) To watch video of this story, click http://dinkyurl.com/cSPkNf

(Editing by Clarence Fernandez)