South Korea confirms endangered stork breeding successful

Endangered stork breeding attempt succeeds in central S. Korea

2016/05/23 11:59

YESAN, South Korea, May 23 (Yonhap) — A released stork has hatched two chicks in the wild in the country’s central region, marking the species’ first natural breeding in the country, the Yesan municipal government said Monday, quoting a research center tasked with restoring the endangered bird.

The Oriental White Stork Park in Yesan, a town in South Korea’s central province of South Chungcheong, said its researchers confirmed the chicks in a nest of a female stork named Minhwang and a male stork named Manhwang on Sunday. The two are part of eight storks that the park returned to the wild in September last year.

The female stork Minhwang (L) and male stork Manhwang tend to their newly hatched chicks at a stork park in Yesan, a town about 134 kilometers south of Seoul, in this photo provided on May 23, 2016, by the Yesan municipality. (Yonhap) The female stork Minhwang (L) and male stork Manhwang tend to their newly hatched chicks at a stork park in Yesan, a town about 134 kilometers south of Seoul, in this photo provided on May 23, 2016, by the Yesan municipality. (Yonhap)

Observation of the chicks through a telescope showed they are around 10 centimeters long, and they are believed to have hatched on Friday and Sunday, respectively, based on their body sizes, the center said.

It is the first time since 1971, when the species became extinct in the wild in South Korea that the stork has had natural breeding. About a month ago, the park said Minhwang laid at least two eggs in the wild.

Minhwang and Manhwang had flown as far as North Korea via the southwestern town of Yeonggwang before settling in the nest early last month. The couple were spotted taking turns sitting on the eggs and keeping the nest in good shape, it said.

This file photo, dated Sept. 3, 2015, shows Oriental white storks being released into the wild from a stork park in the town of Yesan, 134 kilometers south of Seoul. (Yonhap) This file photo, dated Sept. 3, 2015, shows Oriental white storks being released into the wild from a stork park in the town of Yesan, 134 kilometers south of Seoul. (Yonhap)

The Yesan municipal government established the park in 2009 as part of its efforts to promote the reintroduction of the bird, designated as national monument No. 199, and released six adult storks and two young ones into the wild last year. It plans to return 10 storks a year to the wild after reorienting them.

namsh@yna.co.kr

(END)

Jane Goodall Writes Letter to Cincinnati Zoo Director After Gorilla Killed

Jane Goodall Writes Letter to Cincinnati Zoo Director After Gorilla Killed

Source: Jane Goodall Writes Letter to Cincinnati Zoo Director After Gorilla Killed | NBC Chicago http://www.nbcchicago.com/news/local/Jane-Goodall-Writes-Letter-to-Cincinnati-Zoo-Director-After-Gorilla-Killed-381577621.html#ixzz4ATI6CLB3
Follow us: @nbcchicago on Twitter | nbcchicago on Facebook

Trial program that allows leashed dogs inside four previously “No animal” county parks likely to stay

Dogs having their days at designated county parks

 Published May 22, 2016 – 12:30am

HOLLYN JOHNSON/Tribune-Herald Kirsten Wong holds her 13-year-old dog, Mickey, Friday afternoon after a walk at Auhalani Park.

By KIRSTEN JOHNSON Hawaii Tribune-Herald

Hawaii Island dog owners have something to bark about. A trial program that allows leashed dogs inside four previously “No animal” county parks is probably here to stay.

Since 2014, Ainaola Park, Gilbert Carvalho Park, Ahualani Park and Machado Acres Park have allowed county-licensed dogs within certain areas, so long as they’re tethered by a leash less than 6 feet long and owners pick up their waste.

The policy has bucked an overarching no animal rule in place at most county recreational parks and all county beach parks.

Parks and Recreation spokesman Jason Armstrong said Friday the department plans to continue the program and is “expecting to make (it) permanent.” It’s worked out well, he said, and has reduced the number of complaints the department once received resulting from confrontations between pet owners and other park patrons.

“The complaints have tapered off,” he said. Continue reading

Beetles and forests

A forest full of beetles: an interview with bug researcher Caroline Chaboo

1st March 2016 / Shreya Dasgupta

Mongabay interviewed Caroline Chaboo, an Assistant Professor at the University of Kansas, who has been documenting beetles in the forests of Peru since 2008. Chaboo hopes that the beetle diversity she is uncovering in Peru will help showcase the value of the Peruvian forests.

Published under Creative Commons BY-NC-ND
  • Caroline Chaboo has been documenting beetle diversity in the Peruvian forests since 2008.
  • She focuses on leaf beetles, one of the most commonly encountered groups of beetles.
  • Mongabay spoke with Chaboo about her love for beetles, and her work in Peru.

Beetles are everywhere.

Of the roughly 1.5 million species described so far, beetles account for around 400,000 species, making them the most species-rich group known in the world. In contrast, birds account for only around 10,000 of all described species, while only 5,600 of all known species are mammals.

Beetles are incredibly adaptable and diverse. They have learned to use a wide variety of habitats, and have become very specialized in the process, playing crucial roles in the ecosystem. They are important pollinators, recyclers, scavengers and decomposers. Much of beetle diversity, however, is yet to be uncovered.

In Peru, Caroline Chaboo, an Assistant Professor at the University of Kansas, is doing just that. Since 2008, she has been meticulously collecting beetles in the Peruvian forests, hoping to build an accurate picture of the rich beetle diversity there.

 

(…)Mongabay spoke with Chaboo about her love for beetles, and her work in Peru.

Pseudocalaspidea: Very little is known about this spectacular leaf beetle from ACA Villa Carmen Biological station. Photo by Caroline Chaboo.
Pseudocalaspidea: Very little is known about this spectacular leaf beetle from ACA Villa Carmen Biological station. Photo by Caroline Chaboo.

Continue reading

#BoycottSimons: Stop Torturing Rabbits for Fashion

Stop Torturing Rabbits for Fashion

Angora rabbit by Weißes Satinangora

Target: Peter Simons, CEO of Simons

Goal: End the sale of angora fur obtained from terrified, mistreated rabbits at the fashion retailer Simons.

Angora fur is obtained by shearing or ripping the fur from angora rabbits every three months. The ordeal is terrible and painful either way it is done. The rabbits scream out in pain and will sometimes go into shock afterwards. When their fur begins to lose its luster, the rabbits are killed. The major fashion retailer, Simons, sells various products, including clothing and house decor, that are made out of angora fur.

Most fur comes from fur farms where animals, including foxes, minks and rabbits, are crammed into tiny cages and killed using whatever technique is cheapest. Life on a fur farm is a miserable existence.

Sign this petition and demand Simons stop selling products made from angora fur. Animals should not be subjected to a life of pain just for an unnecessary accessory.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Mr. Simons,

Your company, Simons, sells a variety of products from clothing to home decor. Unfortunately, a numerous amount of products contain fur and angora fur.

Most fur comes from fur farms where animals are crammed in cages so small they can only take a few steps. When their fur is needed, they are killed using the cheapest method possible, including suffocation, neck-breaking and anal electrocution.

Angora is obtained by shearing or ripping the fur from the rabbit every three months. The process is incredibly barbaric and gruesome. The pain is so bad that many rabbits go into shock after the ordeal. When the prime years are over, the rabbits are killed.

Please consider no longer selling items made from fur and angora fur. No animal should be tortured all its life for such arbitrary items.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

Photo credit: Weißes Satinangora