Plans to combat poverty in Peru revealed

Outgoing President Ollanta Humala, left, and Peru’s President-elect Pedro Pablo Kuczynski at the government palace in Lima, Peru. June 22, 2016. (Credit: AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

Just weeks after his election, President-elect Pablo Kuczynski demonstrated his commitment to tackling inequality and poverty in the Andean nation.

“In 2001 we started with 54 percent of Peruvians in poverty, now we are at 23 percent. It’s an ambitious goal, but I want the poverty [rate]no more than 10 percent,” Kuczynski said in an interview with Peruvian broadcaster RPP on Sunday.

To reach his goal, Kuczynski will need to cut Peru’s current poverty rate by more than half, although the poverty rate only inched down 1 percentage point last year. Kuczynski also aims to make significant reductions in extreme poverty – defined by the World Bank as living under$1.90 a day – from the current rate of 4.1 percent to no more than 1 percent or 2 percent.

(…)

Advertisements

Fremont gets new park with panoramic views

A view of the city of Fremont from the new Vargas Plateau Regional Park in Fremont, Calif., on Wednesday, May 4, 2016.

Fremont: New park with panoramic views unveiled

By Denis Cuff, @bayareanewsgroup.com

POSTED:   05/04/2016 12:56:24 PM PDT | UPDATED:   3 DAYS AGO

A view of the city of Fremont from the new Vargas Plateau Regional Park in Fremont, Calif., on Wednesday, May 4, 2016. (Anda Chu / Bay Area News Group)

FREMONT — The first new East Bay Regional park in six years opens Thursday in the hills between Fremont and Sunol with sweeping views of San Francisco Bay, six new miles of trails, and places for future trail connections to several parks.

The $8 million Vargas Plateau Regional Park has 1,249 acres of rolling hills and wooded canyons on a 1,000-foot-elevation plateau with scenic places to hike, run, and ride mountain bikes and horses.

Continue reading

Amazon: Xipaya heritage meets beiradeiros culture

Report from the Amazon: Indigenous and non-indigenous cultures, once hostile to each other, now mingle

24th March 2016 / Sue Branford

Xipaya Indians and beiradeiros (river people), are finding a life in common in the village of Tukaya on the remote reaches of the Iriri River.

Report from the Amazon: Indigenous and non-indigenous cultures, once hostile to each other, now mingle
Published under Creative Commons BY-NC-ND
  • A small team of fact-finding researchers heads up the Iriri River, stopping at the village of Tukaya in time to enjoy a festival with the Xipaya Indians and their non-indigenous neighbors, the beiradeiros (river people).
  • The two cultures, which once loathed each other, are experiencing a slow, contradictory, mixing of traditions. Older Indians sometimes deny and downplay their indigenous heritage, while younger ones embrace and celebrate it. Of course, the younger Indians have also wholeheartedly adopted some modern conveniences, like disposable diapers.
  • Likewise the beiradeiros: they once enjoyed more privileges than the much abused Indians, but now complain that those living in the federally declared indigenous reserves have more advantages than their riverine counterparts. The day ends symbolically with a festival, as Indians and river people — antagonists long ago — join together in a community dance. Continue reading

Beetles and forests

A forest full of beetles: an interview with bug researcher Caroline Chaboo

1st March 2016 / Shreya Dasgupta

Mongabay interviewed Caroline Chaboo, an Assistant Professor at the University of Kansas, who has been documenting beetles in the forests of Peru since 2008. Chaboo hopes that the beetle diversity she is uncovering in Peru will help showcase the value of the Peruvian forests.

Published under Creative Commons BY-NC-ND
  • Caroline Chaboo has been documenting beetle diversity in the Peruvian forests since 2008.
  • She focuses on leaf beetles, one of the most commonly encountered groups of beetles.
  • Mongabay spoke with Chaboo about her love for beetles, and her work in Peru.

Beetles are everywhere.

Of the roughly 1.5 million species described so far, beetles account for around 400,000 species, making them the most species-rich group known in the world. In contrast, birds account for only around 10,000 of all described species, while only 5,600 of all known species are mammals.

Beetles are incredibly adaptable and diverse. They have learned to use a wide variety of habitats, and have become very specialized in the process, playing crucial roles in the ecosystem. They are important pollinators, recyclers, scavengers and decomposers. Much of beetle diversity, however, is yet to be uncovered.

In Peru, Caroline Chaboo, an Assistant Professor at the University of Kansas, is doing just that. Since 2008, she has been meticulously collecting beetles in the Peruvian forests, hoping to build an accurate picture of the rich beetle diversity there.

 

(…)Mongabay spoke with Chaboo about her love for beetles, and her work in Peru.

Pseudocalaspidea: Very little is known about this spectacular leaf beetle from ACA Villa Carmen Biological station. Photo by Caroline Chaboo.
Pseudocalaspidea: Very little is known about this spectacular leaf beetle from ACA Villa Carmen Biological station. Photo by Caroline Chaboo.

Continue reading